PersonaMozilla has pushed out the second beta version of its Persona authentication system . The move is the latest step in the company’s campaign to rid the Web of passwords and make it easier for consumers to log on to sites regardless of the browser they’re using.

The goal of Persona is that it will ultimately act as an alternative way for users to sign up for websites without having to enter new passwords or come up with new login credentials. The movement will also do away with the need for webmasters to securely store their users’ passwords.

The most noticeable change with Beta 2 is that Mozilla has brought on Yahoo as a supporting website. This means through what it’s calling “Identity Bridging,” users can log into Persona-supported websites with their yahoo.com e-mail address.

While Yahoo has already been bridged, the functionality is in place for all domains. Now Mozilla is in the process of trying to convince webmasters to enable users to log into Persona sites via their own personal domains with the help of their Persona Identity Provider tool.

The update also includes the requisite performance improvements and other new features, according to an entry on Mozilla’s Identity Tumblr blog by the company’s Director of Identity, Ben Adida, earlier today.

Some of those features include new 200 percent load times and the system’s infusion into the service’s forthcoming FirefoxOS, due to start surfacing in devices this summer.

The group’s first Persona build came in September when it announced a new “cryptographic identity assertion” technology that lasts only a few minutes and is only valid for one site log-in credential. Persona insists the “simple, one-time process” only takes two clicks and benefits users and developers alike.

Going forward, the sans password route will likely be new territory for many internet users. The technology differs from similar services like Facebook Connect and OpenID as Persona doesn’t rely on a centralized security infrastructure.

Categories: Privacy, Videos

Comments (9)

  1. joe
    1

    I love firefox but I would rather remember 100 passwords in my head than use a service like this.

    I will leave Firefox before I use this.

     

  2. tim
    2

    Ditto.

    If someone breaks into some company’s website or physical location, I’d rather have one service compromised than all of them at once.

     

  3. Anonymous
    3

    What part of

    “Going forward, the sans password route will likely be new territory for many internet users. The technology differs from similar services like Facebook Connect and OpenID as Persona doesn’t rely on a centralized security infrastructure.”

    do you not understand?


  4. Anonymous
    4

    Does this mean that if someone  hacks your email and gets your pasword (seems to happen these days) that they then have access to log into any web site including banking, credit card etc?

  5. Anonymous
    5

    One simple question: what’s in it for Mozilla?

     

    One more simple question: Who is paying Mozilla that much money to fund this initiative? 

     

    Last simple question: Why you are still capitalizing on the single factor authentication paradigm, isn’t the time to add one more factor?

  6. Anonymous
    6

    Where does it say that the method of access used by Persona depends upon one site storing your passwords?  You are assuming something that is not in evidence.  

  7. Anonymous
    7

    Did you not see te note, tat the Persona system does not rely on centralized storage?

  8. joe
    8

    You are assuming that I am assuming something that I am not.

    I simply don’t want all my accounts linked together, not this way and not any other way, central database or not.

  9. Anonymous
    9

    This is hilariously stubborn of you. Without some way to manage passwords, you cannot possibly remember 100+ truely strong passwords. If you can, they are not strong by todays standards.

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