Latest Articles

[img_assist|nid=5052|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=100|height=100]There’s a potential threat lurking in your internet café, say University
of Calgary computer science researchers. It’s called Typhoid adware and
works in similar fashion to Typhoid Mary, the first identified healthy
carrier of typhoid fever who spread the disease to dozens of people in
the New York area in the early 1900s. Read the full article. [Science Daily]

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Categories: Malware, Vulnerabilities

[img_assist|nid=5043|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=100|height=100]A researcher has developed a new type of phishing attack that takes advantage of the way that browsers handle tabbed browsing and enables an attacker to use a script running in one tab to completely change the content in another tab. The attack, demonstrated by Aza Raskin of Mozilla, could be used for highly targeted attacks against customers of a specific bank, Webmail service or credit-card company.

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[img_assist|nid=5041|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=100]Nearly one-third of all identity theft victims
say they are unable to completely clear up damaged credit or criminal
records in the aftermath of their identities being abused. But the good
news is they’re spending much less time and money cleaning up the fraud
perpetrated against them in their names, according to a newly released
report. Read the full article. [Dark Reading]

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[img_assist|nid=5028|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=100|height=100]After more than two years, Apple’s Safari browser for Macs remains
vulnerable to attacks that allow websites to litter a user’s hard drive
with thousands of malicious files. The “carpet bomb” vulnerability was publicly disclosed in May 2008 after members of Apple’s security team said they didn’t consider the quirk a security issue. Read the full article. [The Register]

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Categories: Social Engineering

[img_assist|nid=5026|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=100]One of the more trite and oft-repeated maxims in the software industry goes something like this: We’re not focusing on security because our customers aren’t asking for it. They want features and functionality. When they ask for security, then we’ll worry about it. Not only is this philosophy doomed to failure, it’s now being repeated in the realm of privacy, with potentially disastrous effects.

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