Browsing Category: Social Engineering

Report: Syrian Government Using Targeted Skype Attacks, Malware To Spy On Dissidents

In a post on the F-Secure Labs blog, Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen says the firm received a hard drive image from a “contact” within Syria who believed that his computer had been compromised. An F-Secure analysis of the drive’s contents and Web history revealed evidence of a targeted attack that used a malicious Skype chat link to install a copy of Xtreme RAT, a remote access tool that’s commercially available online.

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Video: Privacy in the Age of Augmented Reality

Threatpost has spoken before with Carnegie Mellon University professor Alessandro Acquisti, one of the country’s leading authorities on the impact of social networks and emerging technologies on privacy. In a talk last week at Stanford University’s Center for Internet and Society titled “Privacy in the Age of Augmented Reality,” the professor who specializes in the economics of privacy, shares his research on how loose privacy protections affect how people conduct themselves on social networks.

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Executives Abroad May Get Owned Before They’re Off The Tarmac

[img_assist|nid=10958|title=Justin Morehouse|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=100|height=100]Corporate executives and other high value employees traveling abroad need to be on guard for attempts to compromise their mobile devices, and could even have their mobile phone compromised before they even disembark the plane following their arrival, according to security researcher Justin Morehouse. A thirst for intellectual property and trade secrets, and a bugeoning market of sophisticated mobile surveillance tools means that executives need to begin thinking and acting like spies in order to avoid being spied upon themselves, according to a presentation at the OWASP AppSec DC 2012 conference in Washington DC on Thursday.

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Symantec Experiment: Half Of Those Who Find Smartphones Don’t Return Them

Good Samaritans are few and far between when it comes to lost cell phones, according to the conclusions of a social experiment conducted by security firm Symantec. Smart phones are unlikely to be returned by those who find them, but very likely to be perused for sensitive data including photos, social media applications and banking applications.

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