Browsing Category: Social Engineering

The latest MySpace attac[img_assist|nid=1616|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=115|height=115]k tries to lure recipients into giving up their
MySpace credentials, and then attempts to trick victims into installing
password-stealing malicious software. Attackers began blasting out the junk e-mails early Monday, according to researchers at the University of Alabama, Birmingham, Researchers at the school so far have tracked more than 30 Web site names associated with this attack, each beginning with “accounts.myspace.com” and ending in a United Kingdom country code domain (.uk). Read the full article. [Washington Post] 

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Categories: Social Engineering

[img_assist|nid=1595|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=115|height=115]A team of Catalan researchers has developed a protocol to distort the
user profile generated by Internet search engines, in such a way that
they cannot save the searches undertaken by Internet users and thus
preserve their privacy.  Read the full story [Science Daily]

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Individual [img_assist|nid=1443|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=115|height=115]data compromised in a data breach is four times more likely to be used for identity theft finds Javelin Research in a multi-year study. Another key finding cited: Most consumers do not see the link between breaches and identity theft. “[D]espite 19.5 percent of breach victims
suffering some kind of fraud in the past year, only 2 percent attribute
their fraud to the breach.” Read the full article. [Dark Reading]

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The[img_assist|nid=1529|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=115|height=115] state of Maryland tested a new cryptographic voting system on Election day that allowed users to confirm their votes online, as well as allow anyone to independently audit the system. Scantegrity is an optical-scan, open-source system that uses a combination of paper ballots and unique cryptographic codes inside the ballots. It was designed by David Chaum and researchers from MIT, Univ. of Maryland, George Washington Univ., the Univ. of Ottawa, and the Univ. of Waterloo. Read the full article. [Wired]

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Martin Quoc Pham, 28, of Garden Grove was sentenced by a judge to 11 [img_assist|nid=1443|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=115|height=115]years in Federal prison for spearheading an identity theft ring targeting home equity lines. The compromised accounts of JP Morgan Chase customers were fraudulently accessed and lines of credit were stolen including nearly $1 million that was transferred to accounts controlled by the ring.

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The U.S. C[img_assist|nid=1138|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=120|height=186]omputer Emergency Readiness Team warned BlackBerry users on Tuesday about a new program called PhoneSnoop that allows someone to remotely eavesdrop on phone conversations.The PhoneSnoop application must be installed on the phone by someone who has physical access to it or by tricking the user into downloading it, the CERT advisory said. Read the full story [CNET/Elinor Mills]

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Categories: Social Engineering

[img_assist|nid=597|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=115|height=115]Guest editorial by Eugene KasperskyThere seems to be quite a loud
response to what I thought was a rather simple idea. In this post, I am
going to go over the main points – somewhere when I have more time I’ll
share my ideas in detail so people could see exactly what I am
proposing.

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Categories: Social Engineering

Just 4% of users of corporate systems abide by IT security policies, even when that system handles very sensitive private information according to an academic survey [pdf] that has revealed humans to be the main flaw in any security system.

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and  IT University, Copenhagen found that just 4% of the people surveyed obey best practice rules for passwords. The rest use the same passwords for different systems or use words that appear in the dictionary or write their passwords down on post-it notes beside the computer.  Read the full story [out-law.com]

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