Central Intelligence Agency



SAN FRANCISCO– The news keeps getting worse for security firm HBGary Federal. Members of the online mischief-making group Anonymous posted another cache of 20,000 company e-mails Sunday, following a similar disclosure last week. But the real damage from the leak may be yet to come, as sophisticated attackers mine the email trove for information on the company’s business contacts, including U.S. military, intelligence and law enforcement organizations, that could be used later in targeted attacks.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued a call for proposals this week in a $40m program to encourage research and development in a wide range of topics related to cyber security: from designing more resilient software, to alternatives to passwords and CAPTCHA technology to prevent automated attacks.

Stuxnet chat saturated the news this week after the New York Times got the cyber security echo chamber going with a story delving into the mysterious worm. But Stuxnet was hardly the only news this week, which also saw new research from the Black Hat Briefings conference in Washington D.C. and progress on the strange disappearance of security researcher Dancho Danchev. Read on for the full week in review.

CORRECTION: This article originally included the incorrect name for an associate of  A.Q. Khan. The correct name of the associate is “Friedrich Tinner,” a Swiss nuclear engineer. The name has been corrected in the article.The author of a new book on the evolution of the world’s first nuclear black market says that Stuxnet is just the latest in a long string of efforts by the U.S. and its allies to slow or stop the creation of nuclear programs by rogue nations.

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