in the cloud


Attackers to Exploit Search Personalization, Supply Chains

Information systems and algorithms designed to personalize online search results will give attackers the ability to influence the information available to their victims in the coming years. Researchers, in turn, must seek ways to fortify these systems against malicious manipulation, according to the Emerging Cyber Threats Report 2013 [PDF], a report released ahead of yesterday’s Georgia Tech Cyber Security Summit 2012.


VIEW SLIDESHOW: Weird Science: 10 Forms of Biometric Authentication In the past twenty years, we’ve gone from using amber-tinted dumb terminals connected to refrigerator-sized mainframe computers to sleek tablet computers and smart phones tucked into our pockets. Despite those changes, one technology has stubbornly persisted: passwords. Indeed, the explosion in computing devices and Web-based services has made us more dependent on passwords than ever.

Greg Hoglund, CEO of HBGary, admits that lackluster security at his company played a central role in the breach that led to the release of some 50,000 company emails, but also disputes common understanding and reported details of the hack and the group behind it, going so far as to say there was actually no hack at all.

Greg Hoglund, CTO of HBGary, admits that lackluster security played a central role in the breach that led to the release of some 50,000 company emails, but also disputes common understanding and reported details of the hack, going so far as to say there was actually no hack at all.

IT professionals are fearful that sensitive data will fall into the
wrong hands if cloud-based services are used by their organizations, but
many acknowledge that the risks are being ignored by some employees who
may already be using cloud computing, according to a new survey. Read the full article.  [TechTarget]

The recent ACM Cloud Computing Security Workshop in Chicago was devoted specifically to cloud security. Speakers included Whitfield Diffie, a cryptographer and security
researcher who, in 1976, helped solve a fundamental problem of
cryptography: how to securely pass along the “keys” that unlock
encrypted material for intended recipients. Diffie, now a visiting professor at Royal Holloway, University of
London, was until recently a chief security officer at Sun
Microsystems. He sat down with Technology Review’s chief
correspondent. Read the full article. [Technology Review]

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