dbir



Targeted cyberespionage attacks have dominated discussions within the security community and outside of it from the mainstream media to the halls of the executive and legislative branches of government.  But until now, discussions about attacks stemming from China that target intellectual property from engineering, manufacturing and military interests in the United States, have been anecdotal […]

It can be hard to parse the results of the Verizon Data Breach Investigation Report (DBIR), what with the shifts from year to year in the sources of breach data collected. Last year’s report, if you recall, found a stunning drop in incidents of data theft in 2010, even as tracking sites like Datalossdb.org reported no noticeable change that year.Frankly, it’s hard to read the DBIR and not have the term “sample bias” float into your head time and again. But the DBIR report has always been a good way to understand the security Zeitgeist, and this year’s report is no different, with more normal-seeming results and a focus on the actions of ideologically motivated hacking groups which, Verizon claims, were linked to 58% of all the data stolen from customers in 2011.

by B.K. DeLongWikileaks’ decision this week to post the first of five million emails from Texas-based strategic intelligence firm Stratfor shone a spotlight on what experts say is a serious and growing problem: lax data, network and physical security at third party vendors and service providers.  But organizations that think they can wash their hands of the security mess caused by business partners and contractors may be in for a rude awakening.

This year’s Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR) challenge is  well and truly underway.  I see where the (public) contestants are stumped so, here’s a clue to nudge them along:

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