Snow Leopard


Apple Malware Blocker Left For Dead?

Nearly six months after Apple added a malware blocker to Mac OS X (Snow Leopard), the feature appears to be collecting cobwebs.Apple has not added any anti-malware signature updates to the XProtect.plist file that launched with antidotes for OSX.RSPlug.A and OSX.Iservice, two known Trojan horse programs targeting Mac OS X users.

Mac OS X Mega-Update Fixes 33 Security Defects

Apple today shipped another Mac OS X mega-update with fixes for at least 33 serious security problems affecting Mac OS X users.

The update includes patches for third party components like Adobe’s Flash Player plug-in, Clam AV, MySQL and PHP.  A separate update was released for Snow Leopard to fix the issue where a vulnerable version of Flash Player was included with the new operating system.  Read the full story [zdnet.com]

Snow Leopard Ships With Vulnerable Flash Player

Apple’s new operating system comes with an outdated version of Flash Player that exposes Mac users to hacker attacks.
The initial release of Mac OS X 1..6 (Snow Leopard) includes Flash Player 10.0.23.1, which is very much out of date.   The fully patched version of Flash Player for Mac is version 10.0.32.18.  Read the full story [zdnet.com]


The built-in malware protection in Apple’s Snow Leopard upgrade appears to be nothing more than a XProtect.plist file containing five signatures for two of the most popular Mac OS X trojans — OSX.RSPlug and OSX.Iservice.  Read the full story [zdnet.com]

Apple’s commercials may give the impression that Macs are virus-free but the company isn’t taking any chances with the newest Mac OS X refresh.

Apple has quietly added a new Snow Leopard feature to scan software downloads for malware, a no-brainer move that coincides with a noticeable spike in malicious files embedded in pirated copies of Mac-specific software. Read the full story [zdnet.com]

Apple’s commercials may give the impression that Macs are virus-free but the company isn’t taking any chances with the newest Mac OS X refresh.

Apple has quietly added a new Snow Leopard feature to scan software downloads for malware, a no-brainer move that coincides with a noticeable spike in malicious files embedded in pirated copies of Mac-specific software. Read the full story [zdnet.com]

Little, if anything, gets Mac users more exercised than a mention of their favorite machine’s security problems. Despite the fact that security experts believe Macs to be much easier to exploit than Windows machines, Mac users simply trot out the old saw about there not being any virus attacks on Macs. Not only is that assertion demonstrably false, but it misses the point entirely: Virus attacks are not an indicator of the security of an operating system.

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