Anon Tweets About Hack, Gets Arrested

A 21 year-old Ohio man associated with the Anonymous Internet collective is in detention after boasting on Twitter about his involvement in the hack of the Utah Chiefs of Police Association and the Salt Lake City Police Department.

A 21 year-old Ohio man associated with the Anonymous Internet collective is in detention after boasting on Twitter about his involvement in the hack of the Utah Chiefs of Police Association and the Salt Lake City Police Department.

John Anthony Borell III was charged with two counts of computer intrusion after he used a computer program to launch a SQL injection attack that comprTomised the websites of the Utah Chiefs of Police and the SLCPD in January, according to a grand jury indictment unsealed on April 4.

Borell might have gotten away with it too, if he hadn’t taken credit for the attack on his Twitter account (handle: @ItsKahuna), posting the admin username and password combination of the Utah Chiefs of Police Association and another message castigating “Whoever removed the Megaupload image from (the Chiefs of Police Association Web site) and replaced it with their nick when I hacked it for a purpose.” Borell followed those with tweets taking credit for hacking the SLCPD website and denigrating the SLCPD. He is also alleged to have published much of the information gleaned in this attack to the text-sharing sites like Pastebin.

Law enforcement gathered the information and connected it to Borell after sending a search warrant to Twitter and receiving an IP audit in return. He was arrested in late March.

Borell’s indictment (which can be read in its entirety here) was unsealed on the same day as CabinCr3w hacker, Higinio Ochoa was arrested for his alleged involvement in a hack of the Texas Department of Public Safety. CabinCr3w is named in the Borell indictment as part of a hacker collective loosely associated with Anonymous, but with a more well-defined membership and a history of hacking law enforcement organizations.

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Discussion

  • Anonymous on

    he needed a tool to perform SQL injections?..................

  • Anonymous on

    Just another idiot with a keyboard.
  • Anonymous on

    Real smart - Tweeting about his success to the public....

  • Anonymous on

    He bought his ticket.  He knew what he was getting into.  I say, 'Let'em crash'

  • Warren Mallard on

    Easy for the police, they use tax payers money. Try chasing and identifying  one of these hackers if you are just Fred Blogs, no chance!  Where is their equality at law. People need to have 100 points of identification to open an e-mail account otherwise they dont get access to it. If  people and countries dont become a party to this then those peop[le/ countries not get to transmit  or in the case of countries, outside those countries. Simple. We all need 100 points to open a bank account, register a car, get credit cards etc. but to jump on board the most powerful and potentially destructive vehicle in the world, the internet, you need nothing. In fact e-mail providers even encourgae you to use an alias. Go figure. WE have all become so enamoured of technology and the ability to send defamatory remarks in revenge or malevolence we dont want to lose tyhis ability. Thus we will all become victims of internet fraud in the short and long term. 

  • Anonymous on

    Hopefully other teens will use this as a lesson to study for a real job.

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