April, 2011: PSN and Sony Online Entertainment Data Breach

For a company already bloodied by bad press over its pursuit of
console hackers, its DRM rootkit and laptop battery recalls in 2006 and
2008, you wouldn’t think things could get worse for Sony.

For a company already bloodied by bad press over its pursuit of
console hackers, its DRM rootkit and laptop battery recalls in 2006 and
2008, you wouldn’t think things could get worse for Sony. Then came the
April 20th, 2011 shuttering of its PlayStation Network online gaming
network following what Sony termed an “external intrusion.”
As in previous incidents, Sony’s handling of the breach set it up for
criticism: the company kept mum about the extent of the breach for more
than a week before answering key questions about it – such as whether
account holder data was stolen (it was) or whether stored credit card data was encrypted (it was).
Despite the company’s efforts to do damage control, the weeks since
have brought a drip, drip, drip of bad news, with Sony forced to reverse
earlier statements that its Station.com network wasn’t affected by the
breach, which is now believed to affect up to 100 million customers.

Suggested articles

2020 Cybersecurity Trends to Watch

Mobile becomes a prime phishing attack vector, hackers will increasingly employ machine learning in attacks and cloud will increasingly be seen as fertile ground for compromise.

Top Mobile Security Stories of 2019

Cybercrime increasingly went mobile in 2019, with everything from Apple iPhone jailbreaks and rogue Android apps to 5G and mobile-first phishing dominating the news coverage. Here are Threatpost’s Top 10 mobile security stories of 2019.

Discussion

Subscribe to our newsletter, Threatpost Today!

Get the latest breaking news delivered daily to your inbox.