Browsing Author: Chris Brook

Categories: Slideshow

Click Profile Information.

Compare what you have with what I have. You may want more people to have access to your data. But I generally only want my friends to know most of this stuff.

I allow people to write messages to my wall. Remember, if you write things on other people’s walls, all their friends can see it. If you don’t want that to happen, send them mail instead. Go to Inbox if you want to send mail.

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Categories: Slideshow

Once your account in created, immediately click on “Settings” and you get this page. Note my email address is one I created for use in registering online “play” accounts. I have separated it from my normal email account.

If I lose any of my online accounts, there won’t be any banking information or anything important in that email account.

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Categories: Slideshow

As you create an account on Facebook, be careful about all the personal information you volunteer during the registration process.

Facebook only needs your name and a (fake) birthday.

Do NOT use the same password you use for your e-mail or other sensitive online accounts.  If your Facebook account is compromised, you do not want a hacker owning a password that’s used in multiple places.

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Categories: Slideshow

This presentation was created by Jimmy Kuo, a veteran anti-malware researcher who now works for the Microsoft Security Research & Response team. It covers some basic advice to use Facebook in a secure and private manner.

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Categories: Slideshow

Chris was one of the first
security researchers I met, in 2000, when he and the rest of the L0pht
had just become part of @stake. I’ve probably interviewed him more
often than anyone else on this list and he’s helped me with dozens of
stories over the years. He always had five minutes to explain why I had
screwed something up (often), what a good story angle might be or why
an attack, vulnerability or trend was important (or not).

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Categories: Slideshow

Window occupies an entirely unique
place in the security community. Sure, being a woman in the security
community is rare enough. But she also commands a lot of respect in
this ultra-competitive world, having helped develop Microsoft’s threat
modeling process, worked as a security architect at @stake and as the
top security exec at Mozilla. I’ve seen some of the smartest and most
well-respected researchers in the world ask her opinion on their talks
and papers at conferences.

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Categories: Slideshow

I first met Adam well
before he joined Microsoft and have interviewed and corresponded with
him dozens of times over the years, and I’ve learned something new from
every one of those conversations. Given that the goal of most
interviews is to learn new information, you’d think that would be sort
of common. It’s not. In a lot of interviews, both the writer and the
subject know exactly what will be discussed and much of what will be
said. But Adam, like a lot of the other people on this list, doesn’t
let things go that way.

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Categories: Slideshow

There’s a certain
subset of people who will stop reading this list as soon as they see
Schneier’s name. That’s fine, I get it. Schneier is among the more
controversial figures in the security industry and has more than his
share of both fans and detractors. But this list is people who are
interesting to interview, and Schneier is right up there.

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Categories: Slideshow

Like Geer, Gary has a unique
view of the security world, one that is informed by his background in
cognitive science and philosophy. He just doesn’t come at questions or
problems the way that most people do, and that makes for interesting
conversations. Gary’s among the top experts on software security, but
he’s just as happy to steer the conversation to philosophy,
barn-building or music, and then bring it all back to security and tie
it up in a package. That is non-trivial.

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