Browsing Category: Critical Infrastructure

Huawei, the massive Chinese technology company that has come under criticism for its close ties to China’s government, is defending itself, saying that it has never stolen national intelligence or intellectual property and does not support any groups that do so. The company has been a frequent target of critics who allege that it trades information and secrets with the Chinese government, allegations its officials have consistently denied.

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Researchers say that one of the attack groups using the two new Java zero-day vulnerabilities is the same group that was behind an earlier targeted attack campaign from 2011. That group was traced back to China and was essentially running a spear-phishing campaign, but now the crew, known as Nitro, is using the Java vulnerabilities in Web-based attacks that install the Poison Ivy remote-access tool.

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Officials at oil giant Saudi Aramco have confirmed that about 30,000 of the company’s workstations were hit by a malware attack on August 15, a number that lines up with claims made in posts on Pastebin by a group taking credit for the attack. The company said that while tens of thousands of machines were infected, its core oil production capabilities were not affected by the attack.

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The DHS and ICS-CERT are warning users of some popular Tridium Niagara AX industrial control system software about a series of major vulnerabilities in the applications that are remotely exploitable and could be used to take over vulnerable systems. The bugs, discovered by researchers Billy Rios and Terry McCorkle, are just the latest in a series of vulnerabilities found in the esoteric ICS software packages that control utilities and other critical systems.

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Keeping track of the relationships between various malware families can be hard, especially when you’re talking about espionage tools such as Stuxnet and Gauss. Veracode has put together an infographic as a general recap of the life and times of Stuxnet, the much-discussed cyber worm that first reared its head in mid-2010 after it was found targeting critical infrastructure in Iran. Despite Siemens patching some Stuxnet-like bugs late last month, it’s been a while since we’ve heard from the computer worm. Lately the spotlight has been stolen by a series of Stuxnet descendants such as Duqu, Flame and just revealed yesterday, Gauss.

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One of the more pernicious and as-yet incurable diseases in security is the resistance to sharing data. Organizations large and small collect all sorts of information on attacks, vulnerabilities and threats and, for the most part, it simply sits in databases and is never of any use to anyone outside of the organization. But there’s an effort underway at the Georgia Tech Research Institute to change that through the use of a new information-gathering and analysis system called Titan.

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