Critical Infrastructure


Does DNSSEC Really Interfere With SOPA/PIPA?

By Eric RescorlaYou’ve of course heard by now that much of the Internet community thinks that SOPA and PIPA are bad, which is why on January 16, Wikipedia shut itself down, Google had a black bar over their logo, etc. This opinion is shared by much of the Internet technical community, and in particular much has been made of the argument made by Crocker et al. that DNSSEC and PIPA are incompatible. A number of the authors of the statement linked above are friends of mine, and I agree with much of what they write in it, but I don’t find this particular line of argument that convincing.

UPDATE: Looking For a ‘FireSheep’ Moment, Researchers Lay Bare Woeful SCADA Security

Miami, Florida – A no-holds barred presentation at the S4 Conference laid bare the woeful state of security for many industrial control systems that power the world’s critical infrastructure. Organizers have also cooperated with security scanning firms Rapid7 and Tenable to release modules for the Metasploit and Nessus products that can test for the discovered security holes.


The latest edition World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report takes a dim view of our hyper connected world. At the group’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, members wrestled with the consequences of ubiquitous Internet connectivity, concluding that groups or individuals with few resources are capable of launching attacks with devastating consequences for both commercial and geopolitical powers.

The White House has launched a new initiative designed to help companies in the electric power industry measure the maturity of their security programs against a new maturity model. The program is being run in tandem with the Department of Homeland Security and Department of Energy and is meant to help the utility companies find their weak spots and where they need to improve.

Law enforcement officials in Maryland have issued a warning about the increasing use of smart phones and Web based services to listen in on law enforcement radio transmissions. Gang members, officials warn, are using the smart phone apps to get a jump on enforcement efforts and, in at least one case, to evade capture during a foot chase.

Subscribe to our newsletter, Threatpost Today!

Get the latest breaking news delivered daily to your inbox.