Browsing Category: Malware

Categories: Malware, Web Security

By Gunter Ollmann, Damballa[img_assist|nid=2970|title=|desc=|link=none|align=left|width=100|height=100]The recent Google Advanced Persistent Threat (APT) dialogue has been
hogging the press for a week now, and each day reveals new (and often
conflicting) insight. As I mentioned on Thursdays blog – “Preemptive Protection” Isn’t – If You’re Battling APT’s
– this particular attack doesn’t represent some new shift in tactics.
It’s not the first APT in the world, in fact I’m pretty sure it’s not
Google’s first exposure to APT’s, and I’m certain it isn’t going to the
last. In fact I’d say its a safe bet to say that there are several
other equivalent APT successes currently operating within Google’s
networks waiting to be discovered. Such is the state of the threat.

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[img_assist|nid=2948|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=100|height=100]A study — which was created using the unlikely combination of identity fraud incidence statistics with basic
consumer demographics — indicates that identity thieves are
successfully targeting the wealthy and affluent, regardless of the
systems and software they use. Read the full article. [Dark Reading]

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Categories: Malware

Costin Raiu, chief security expert at Kaspersky Lab in Romania, discusses the state of the threat landscape for the year ahead, including botnets, malicious PDFs and targeted attacks.

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Categories: Malware

A new report published today sheds light on the
steps ultra-sophisticated attackers take to gain a foothold inside
governments and company networks and remain entrenched in order to
steal intellectual property and other data. The bad news is these
attacks — including the recent ones on Google, Adobe, and other
companies — almost always are successful and undetectable until it’s
too late.
Read the full article [Darkreading.com].

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[img_assist|nid=2943|title=|desc=|link=none|align=right|width=100|height=100]A significant discovery in the recent Aurora attack that affected Google, Adobe, Yahoo and others is that the attackers had selected
employees at the companies with access to proprietary data, then learnt
who their friends were. The hackers compromised the social network
accounts of those friends, hoping to enhance the probability that their
final targets would click on the links they sent. Read the full article. [The Financial Times]

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