New OpFake Android Malware Entices Users With Opera Mini Browser

There is a new variant of the OpFake mobile malware making the rounds, and this version comes bundled with a version of the legitimate Opera Mini mobile browser. The malware targets Android phones and steals money from victims by sending SMS messages without the user’s knowledge to premium-rate numbers and also collects data about the device it infects.

Grum Botnet Briefly Revived, Now Dead Again

Botnets are a lot like dandelions; you think they’re dead and then when you’re not looking they pop right back up. It’s happened time and again in the malware ecosystem and the latest member of the undead botnet society is Grum, which was only just taken down last week. Over the weekend several of the command-and-control servers used by the Grum botmasters reappeared in Ukraine.


Mobile security has become a major concern both for consumers and for enterprises worried about the integrity of their sensitive data. Part of that worry centers on the security of the apps on mobile devices, something that’s largely unknowable in a lot of cases right now. Duo Security today is releasing a new app called X-Ray that scans Android devices for known vulnerabilities and alerts users to which ones remain unpatched.

Black Hat is upon us and, with it, a lot of chatter about the dangers posed by so-called “APT,” or advanced persistent threats. Rather than get trapped in the hype bubble, Threatpost editor Paul Roberts took the opportunity to check back in with a recognized expert on detecting and combating APT-style attacks: Amit Yoran, the former CEO of NetWitness Corp. and now a Senior Vice President at RSA, The Security Division of EMC. Yoran says that the darkest days may yet be ahead in the fight against APT style attacks, with mounting attacks and a critical shortage of security talent. To cope, both private sector firms and the government need to stop fighting the last war and pivot to the kinds of practices and monitoring that can spot sophisticated attackers. 

The annual Black Hat Briefings hacker conference got off to a rocky start Sunday after thousands of registered attendees received a fishy smelling “account password reset” e-mail that contained a suspicious URL. But a message from conference organizers hours later said the errant e-mail was no phishing attack, but merely an “abuse of functionality” by a bored Black Hat volunteer.

The annual Black Hat Briefings hacker conference got off to a rocky start Sunday after thousands of registered delegates to the Black Hat Briefings hacker conference in Las Vegas received a fishy smelling “account password reset” e-mail that contained a suspicious URL. But a message from conference organizers hours later said the errant e-mail was no phishing attack, but merely an “abuse of functionality” by a bored Black Hat volunteer.

It’s that most wonderful time of the year again: tool release season. With Black Hat, DEF CON and BSides Las Vegas all looming, researchers are beginning to publish the tools that they’ll be discussing during their talks at the various conferences next week. Among the more interesting releases so far is Termineter, a tool designed for testing the security of smart meters.

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