DARPA to Hackers: Help, Please?

The Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which is credited with helping to create the modern Internet, used a conference to call on hackers and other visionaries to help save it.

The Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which is credited with helping to create the modern Internet, used a conference to call on hackers and other visionaries to help save it.

DARPA’s Director, Dr. Regina Dugan used a speech at the DARPA Colloquium on Future Directions in Cyber Security in Arlington, Virginia, to call on  “visionary hackers, academics, and professionals… to change the dynamic of cyber defense.” 

Dugan said the wave of malicious cyber attacks represent an existential threat to the Internet and have real world ramifications on civilian and military systems.

“Why, despite investing billions of dollars in security, does it feel like we are losing ground?” Dugan asked the audience of beltway and government security experts. The answer, she and others said, is that the government and military are not engaged directly with the threats facing them.

The conference was billed as a frank discussion with the cyber community. It brought together roughly 700 leaders from the armed services, as well as the private sector contractors and hackers for hire. Dugan and other Pentagon and government officials and industry leaders, including former White House Cybersecurity Czar Richard Clarke attempted to define and redefine the threats facing government and military networks. In speeches that were equal parts public relations and team building that cyber defense and offense were top priorities for DARPA and that Congress, rather than DARPA, would eventually govern and oversee the use of any cyber capabilities discovered in the course of their research.

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Discussion

  • Anonymous on

      Can we really trust these hackers, giving them access to systems that have a direct connection to secret data?  It would be like a kid in a candy store, you don't hire the fox to guard the henhouse....

  • Anonymous on

      Can we really trust these hackers, giving them access to systems that have a direct connection to secret data?  It would be like a kid in a candy store, you don't hire the fox to guard the henhouse....

  • Anonymous on

    You have no choice now, do you? No one but a hacker can stop one short of someone pulling the machine offline physically.

  • Anonymous on

    Actually you can mostly trust us. In that in that environment the mind set is going to be a lot different you are actually helping the country, usually when a hacker is doing their thing they are targeting a specific targer or trying out new code of new code on a very old system. Like a 1970ish atari that does not have anything but a operating system and a modem port, with something like this you can usually access most anything in the world as they ( the ppl you are targeting) boxes do not even have the protocals to sence the attack. If they hired old tired  women  I would consider joining the challange, it would be fun.

  • Anonymous on

    I must agree. Hackers usually like to find new things and not all hackers are bad. Without hackers alot of the stuff you use on a daily basis would have never even have been invented.

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