Data Breaches for All

Sony’s online gaming platform, The PlayStation Network (PSN), disappeared for more than a month starting in April, and no amount of double X and O-ing or right joysticking could save it. The reason? A massive attack on PSN’s network knocked the gaming giant offline and exposed the data of more than million users worldwide.

Sony’s online gaming platform, The PlayStation Network (PSN), disappeared for more than a month starting in April, and no amount of double X and O-ing or right joysticking could save it. The reason? A massive attack on PSN’s network knocked the gaming giant offline and exposed the data of more than million users worldwide. The system was brought back online at the end of May, but the company was left with $170 million in clean-up costs and few solid leads regarding the perpetrators. Speculation has run the gamut, from Anonymous hackers to disgruntled ex-employees. While Sony quietly struggled to get PSN back online, most of the security community remained abuzz with news that massive online marketing firm Epsilon had exposed the customer data of unknown millions of end users doing businesses with just about every major corporation in the Western world. From Capital One to Citibank to Disney, few were immune to data breaches in 2011.

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