Google Fixes High-Risk Bugs in Chrome

Google has pushed out a new version of its Chrome browser, fixing two high-priority security bugs as well as several other flaws.

Google has pushed out a new version of its Chrome browser, fixing two high-priority security bugs as well as several other flaws.

Google Chrome 8.0.552.224 is now available in both the stable and beta channels, and Google also has updated the Chromium OS with the new changes. The company released new versions of Chrome for all of the supported platforms, including Windows, OS X and Linux. One of the high-priority bugs fixed in the new release, a problem with bad validation in message deserialization, applies only to systems running 64-bit Linux.

As part of Google’s bug bounty program, the company handed out $2,000 in rewards to researchers who reported vulnerabilities that were fixed in this release: $1,000 to Chris Rohlf for a CSS parsing bug and $1,000 to Sławomir Błażek and Sergey Glazunov for reporting a high-risk bug relating to stale pointers in cursor handling.

Here’s the list of bugs fixed in Chrome:

  • [64-bit Linux only] [56449] High Bad validation for message deserialization on 64-bit builds. Credit to Lei Zhang of the Chromium development community.
  • [60761] Medium Bad extension can cause browser crash in tab handling. Credit to kuzzcc.
  • [63529] Low Browser crash with NULL pointer in web worker handling. Credit to Nathan Weizenbaum of Google.
  • [$1000] [63866] Medium Out-of-bounds read in CSS parsing. Credit to Chris Rohlf.
  • [$1000] [64959] High Stale pointers in cursor handling. Credit to Sławomir Błażek and Sergey Glazunov.

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