Parental Controls, 2.0, 3.0

It wasn’t until the second iteration of iOS that Apple got serious about what happens when children get their hands on their parents’ phones. With 2.0, parents were given the ability to block certain functions on their child’s handset including Safari, YouTube and whether or not anything could be downloaded from the App Store. The Parental Controls feature evolved to Restrictions in 3.0, giving parents the ability to tweak settings that could bar children from listening to music branded as ‘explicit’ and watching R and NC-17 movies.

It wasn’t until the second iteration of iOS that Apple got serious about what happens when children get their hands on their parents’ phones. With 2.0, parents were given the ability to block certain functions on their child’s handset including Safari, YouTube and whether or not anything could be downloaded from the App Store. The Parental Controls feature evolved to Restrictions in 3.0, giving parents the ability to tweak settings that could bar children from listening to music branded as ‘explicit’ and watching R and NC-17 movies. The feature also applies to apps — helping parents keep their children away from violent games and other racy apps according to their explicatory ratings.

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