Smell You Later

In 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security hatched a plan to use body-odor as a method of identifying individuals. The DHS wanted to establish odor based biometric signatures that could uniquely identify both friend and foe. It then might be able to determine if changes in odor could be used as a tool to provide evidence of deception. Civil liberty groups cried foul.

In 2009, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security hatched a plan to use body-odor as a method of identifying individuals. The DHS wanted to establish odor based biometric signatures that could uniquely identify both friend and foe. It then might be able to determine if changes in odor could be used as a tool to provide evidence of deception. Civil liberty groups cried foul. DHS maintained that it just wanted to “[improve] the ability to identify individuals who may intend harm to the nation.”

(Image via kyletaylor‘s Flickr photostream)

Suggested articles

2020 Cybersecurity Trends to Watch

Mobile becomes a prime phishing attack vector, hackers will increasingly employ machine learning in attacks and cloud will increasingly be seen as fertile ground for compromise.

Top Mobile Security Stories of 2019

Cybercrime increasingly went mobile in 2019, with everything from Apple iPhone jailbreaks and rogue Android apps to 5G and mobile-first phishing dominating the news coverage. Here are Threatpost’s Top 10 mobile security stories of 2019.

Discussion

Subscribe to our newsletter, Threatpost Today!

Get the latest breaking news delivered daily to your inbox.