Step 4: Roll Up Your Sleeves

If automated removal fails, you may have to roll up your sleeve and attempt to manually remove the scareware from your system. This isn’t a straight forward process, and will vary depending on what kind of scareware and malware program(s) have been installed. However, if you know what has infected your computer, various tutorials are available online, at Websites and user forums like bleepingcomputer.com.

If automated removal fails, you may have to roll up your sleeve and attempt to manually remove the scareware from your system. This isn’t a straight forward process, and will vary depending on what kind of scareware and malware program(s) have been installed. However, if you know what has infected your computer, various tutorials are available online, at Websites and user forums like bleepingcomputer.com. If all else fails, you may have to resort to recovering whatever sensitive files you can from your computer’s hard drive (booting directly from the CD or DVD your operating system came with can help you circumvent the scareware), reformatting the hard drive, then reinstalling the operating system and applications and restoring sensitive data.

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