Veterans Affairs breaches

The
Department of Veterans Affairs was hit on two separate occasions by breaches in
2006. 26.5 million Veterans and their families had their names, Social Security
numbers and dates of birth lifted after a laptop was swiped from an employee’s home in May.

The
Department of Veterans Affairs was hit on two separate occasions by breaches in
2006. 26.5 million Veterans and their families had their names, Social Security
numbers and dates of birth lifted after a laptop was swiped from an employee’s home in May. The laptop was retrieved in August and two teenagers were arrested
for the theft, claiming they were unaware the laptop contained sensitive data.
Just days after the arrest, the VA announced another computer, this time with
the personal information of 38,000 people had gone missing as well. The
sensitive information, which in both cases was unencrypted, would later lead to
a proposal for renewed reform within the department. The VA had its reputation
sullied even before the breach made headlines. Audits of the department’s IT
security practices had given the VA low and failing grades under the Federal
Information Security Management Act.

Suggested articles

2020 Cybersecurity Trends to Watch

Mobile becomes a prime phishing attack vector, hackers will increasingly employ machine learning in attacks and cloud will increasingly be seen as fertile ground for compromise.

Top Mobile Security Stories of 2019

Cybercrime increasingly went mobile in 2019, with everything from Apple iPhone jailbreaks and rogue Android apps to 5G and mobile-first phishing dominating the news coverage. Here are Threatpost’s Top 10 mobile security stories of 2019.

Discussion

Subscribe to our newsletter, Threatpost Today!

Get the latest breaking news delivered daily to your inbox.