A thorough and freely available tool aims to help security professionals and executives anonymously tabulate the costs incurred on enterprises following all manner of cyber-incidents.

Called CyberTab, the tool was created by The Economist Intelligence Unit and sponsored by the consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton. While the tool is free, it gives users the choice of opting in to allowing their reports to be used as part of a study undertaken by The Economist.

Based on input estimates of incident response and business expenses, as well as those of lost sales and customers, CyberTab calculates the cost of a specific cyber attack and estimates the return on investment for preventative measures.

It has two modes, a planning mode, which estimates the cost of a potential attack to help organizations better understand the risks they face and their security investment choices, and a reporting mode, which examines and reports the cost of a specific attack that has already occurred based on a long list of factors.

Each tool will ask users to identify the type of attack deployed against them. The options include denial of service attacks, malware infections, misuse of systems by employees or partners, intrusions with no data theft, intrusions with personal data theft, and intrusions with intellectual property data theft.

The tools also inquire – again anonymously – about the size of an affected enterprise, the industry and region in which they operate, the duration and time frame of a specific attack, when and by whom was the attack discovered, who carried out the attack, and what sorts of tactics and technologies were deployed by the attackers.

Beyond that, the tools take into account the types of systems and number of servers and endpoints affected by the incident. In the case of DDoS attacks, the tools ask about the peak bandwidth in gigabits per second. The tool further takes into account the company data and types of accounts implicated in the attack. The impact on intellectual property and number of parties affected – employees, consumer and business customers, and partners – as well.

Outside the details of the attack, the tools also seek out specific cost details. How many incident response workers does the company employ? Which and how many technology measures it eh business invested in? Did the organization seek outside help following the incident? Were there legal or customer service and support costs incurred in the incident.

It offers a straightforward user interface and allows users to stop and save their progress at any time.

In the end, the CyberTab tool takes all these and more factors into account and estimates the total potential cost – in ranges – paid by an affected organization and the amount of money that they could save – for each dollar spent – by deploying preventative measures.

 

Categories: Data Breaches, Malware, SMB Security

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