Clarity needed on cyberwar plans, study says

From The New York Times (John Markoff and John Shanker)

A study conducted by the National Academy of Sciences found that the United States military needs to create an open, public dalogue to clarify its plans around using offensive weapons in cyberspace. The study also recommends that the military explain what offensive capabilities it has and how they might be used to counter conventional military attacks.

From The New York Times (John Markoff and John Shanker)

A study conducted by the National Academy of Sciences found that the United States military needs to create an open, public dalogue to clarify its plans around using offensive weapons in cyberspace. The study also recommends that the military explain what offensive capabilities it has and how they might be used to counter conventional military attacks.

The New York Times reports that the study’s recommendations run counter to the way things have been done in the past.

In the United States, the offensive use of cyberweapons is a highly classified military secret. There have been reports going back to the 1990s that United States intelligence agencies have mounted operations in which electronic gear was systematically modified to disrupt the activities of an opponent or for surveillance purposes. But these activities have not been publicly acknowledged by the government.

Read the full Times story here.

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