Step 2: Don’t Pay

Don’t Pay! Whatever else you do not pay to “license” the scareware, says Brulez. Scareware and fake antivirus programs are malicious and are created and distributed by criminal organizations. Paying the licensing fee may temporarily free up your system and remove the fake warnings and alerts generated by the program, but it will only be a matter of time before the folks behind the scam will be back for another swipe at your wallet.

Don’t Pay! Whatever else you do not pay to “license” the scareware, says Brulez. Scareware and fake antivirus programs are malicious and are created and distributed by criminal organizations. Paying the licensing fee may temporarily free up your system and remove the fake warnings and alerts generated by the program, but it will only be a matter of time before the folks behind the scam will be back for another swipe at your wallet. Beyond that, by paying the fee, you are providing the cybercriminals with financial information, such as a credit card number or paypal account information, that might be used for identity theft or other scams.

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