Where to Begin

Scareware is one of the most pernicious online threats. For those who have been infected, it is also one of the hardest to forget. Rogue antivirus software and other forms of scareware hold victims hostage: shutting off access to their desktop and most of the Internet, disabling security software and preventing them from removing the malicious program. Behind the scenes, scareware often installs other malicious programs, like Trojan horse and bot software. If you’re unlucky enough to get infected with one of these bad boys, what can you do to remove it?

Scareware is one of the most pernicious online threats. For those who have been infected, it is also one of the hardest to forget. Rogue antivirus software and other forms of scareware hold victims hostage: shutting off access to their desktop and most of the Internet, disabling security software and preventing them from removing the malicious program. Behind the scenes, scareware often installs other malicious programs, like Trojan horse and bot software. If you’re unlucky enough to get infected with one of these bad boys, what can you do to remove it? Threatpost asked leading anti malware researchers for their thoughts and suggestions on recovering from a scareware attack. Here’s what they told us:

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